Posts Tagged ‘Craig Logan’

In 1988 an Australian stair running champion arrived at the Empire State Building Run-Up, and in doing so he would kick start a long tradition of Aussie dominance at the event.

If you missed the first installment of this series on the history of the ESBRU covering 1978-1980, you can read it here. Or jump back to 1981-1983, or 1984-1987, instead.

Otherwise read on for the next installment in the series and find out what happened at ESBRU between 1988 and 1990.

1988 – The Aussies arrive

On Sunday 2nd August 1987 the first Rialto Tower Run-Up took place in Melbourne, Australia. As the event had been inspired by the ESBRU, the organisers offered the fastest man and woman an all-round trip to New York, plus entry to the 1988 Empire State Building Run-Up.

Challenging for the top prize that Sunday were two-time Olympic marathoner (1976/1980) Chris Wardlaw, steeplechase champion Craig Logan, who also had a sub-30-minute 10km time, and mountain runner Robin Rishworth.

In the end it was Logan who was fastest up the 54-floor Rialto Tower in 7:28. He was getting married in January 1988 and was going to use his free trip to New York as a honeymoon. He’d make time for the ESBRU.

On Wednesday 17th February 1988 Logan was on the start line alongside 78 other men, ready to battle it out for the 11th ESBRU title – plus an Apple computer from the race sponsors. Alongside him were Joe Kenny, who was third the year before, Daniel Glickenhaus who had been fourth, and two-time champion Jim Ochse (1980 and 1982). Five-time champion Al Waquie did not return to defend his title. He told organisers he couldn’t get the time off work, but surely his troublesome knee also played a factor in him checking out on top.

Logan blasted off the start line and into the stairwell ahead of all the others. He would not relinquish the lead the whole way up, reaching the top of the 1,576 steps in 11:29.

1988 ESBRU

He held off a challenge from Joe Kenny, who you can see in the photo below was just yards behind, finishing in 11:32.

1988 craig logan finish 2

As they had done for the previous few years, The Indianapolis News ran a detailed post-race report on Joe Kenny’s experience at the ESBRU.

‘I had him in my sights all the way’, Kenny told reporter Mike Davis, ‘I just ran out of floors.’

Kenny was around the 18th person into the stairwell. ‘There was a huge pileup of bodies at the start, but I paced myself pretty well, and by the 20th floor crossover I was sixth. It was just like a regular race – I was in control, passing people and even keeping track of my splits.

‘Last year I just died at the 50th floor and was in agony the whole last way. This time was different, though.’ At the 65th floor, he [Kenny] moved past the top woman and found out he was only six seconds behind Logan. ‘I thought, ”I’ll get this guy”, but he was just too strong.’

1988 craig logan finish photo

The agony of victory – 1988 ESBRU champ Craig Logan suffers at the finish line

For his part, Logan said, ‘I’m probably just good at running up stairs. I was ahead all the way. I got in the stairwell first and stayed in front’. But he admitted ‘it gets a bit boring going around, and around, and around.’ The Rialto Tower race had been Logan’s only previous stair climb and he said ‘that one felt harder’.

 

A former champion returns in the women’s division

Janine Aiello, course record holder and champion in 1985 and 1986, returned to tie Nina Kuscsik’s record of three titles in the women’s division.

She was preparing for the 1988 US Olympic marathon trials in May, but took time out of her training schedule to fly in from San Francisco and win in 13:42.

1988 winners together

She pointed out that running stairs isn’t a formal part of her marathon training, and that she enters the ESBRU ‘for the fun of it.’ ‘It doesn’t interfere with my training plans. The only thing is that I like to emphasise aerobic racing. Because you run up steps in the Empire, it’s like an anaerobic event and can be too tiring for many runners’.

‘I knew I had to take it easy in the beginning and let people go out and kill each other for the first 10 or 20 floors…I love this race because it’s a true challenge in every sense of the word…It feels easier every year. You just battle gravity the whole way…The idea of running up a building – it’s really kind of crazy.’

 

Full 1988 ESBRU results – some results may differ from report due to differences in rounding up/down

 

1989 – The Rise of the Aussies

The women’s division of the Melbourne Rialto Tower Run 1988 was won by Suzanne Malaxos. That earned her a spot at ESBRU 1989 and set up a clash of champions; as joining her on the start line in New York on Thursday 9th February was defending ESBRU title holder Janine Aiello. Alongside them were 16 other women.

Malaxos, 27, absolutely destroyed the women’s course record by 49 seconds, winning in a time of 12:24. Aiello took second place.

‘I was fourth in the door and passed one girl virtually straight away, and passed the first two at about the 20th floor and led from then on’, Malaxos said.

‘She [Aiello] had the upper hand and few of the others had previous experience. Once you get on the stairs it is every man for himself, but I guess today was my day. I broke the record by [almost] one minute and that capped it off really nicely. You get into a bit of a rhythym and when you are winning you forget about how much it hurts.’

In the men’s event it was another Australian, 23-year old mountain runner Robin Rishworth, who was victorious among a field of 76 other men. He had earned his spot at the ESBRU by smashing the course record at the Rialto Run-Up in Melbourne a few months before. His winning time at the ESBRU was 11:08.

1989 WINNERS

Advance Australia Fair – Rishworth and Malaxos hug it out with King Kong

With no American winner in either the men’s or women’s race, media coverage the following day was fairly reduced. There were no finish line photos to be found, and just a couple of detailed reports on the event.

Full 1989 ESBRU results – some results may differ from report due to differences in rounding up/down.

1990 – The course record finally falls

On Tuesday 13th February 1990, 110 competitors (91 men and 19 women) took part in the 13th edition of the Empire State Building Run-Up.

1990 mass start

Defending champion Suzanne Malaxos (above centre, wearing #101) was back over from Australia, having won the Rialto Run-up again in 1989.

Malaxos wins Rialto 1989 to enter 1990 esbru

Suzanne Malaxos on her way to winning the 1989 Rialto Tower Run-Up, to earn a spot at ESBRU 1990

Among the tough women she would be facing off against was triathlete, and soon-to-be USA national duathlon champion, Corliss Spencer.

In the end it turned out to be a bit of a one-way contest as Malaxos went sub-13 minutes for the second time in a row, and just three seconds shy of the course record she set the previous year. Her winning time was 12:27. Corliss Spencer was second in 13:10 and J. Hallwood-Miller finished third in 14:51.

The men’s event was a far more competitive affair.

Robin Rishworth returned to have a shot at two wins in a row. But he would be facing some serious competition.

Alongside him on the start line was an outstanding and versatile athlete called Scott Elliott. A runner with a 4:08 mile time and a multi-time winner of the Pikes Peak Half Marathon, Elliott was clocking between 80-100 miles a week in the rarefied air of Boulder, Colorado in the build up to the ESBRU. He even had stair climbing experience, having received an invite to the event after winning a stair race in Denver.

Elliott completely blew the opposition away and broke Pete Squires course record, which has stood since 1981. By finishing in 10:47, he became only the second man to have ever finished the race in under 11 minutes (Squires had managed it by less than half a second). He started some way back from the early leaders but paced himself well, picking off racers and eventually taking the lead at the 76th floor.

Robin Rishworth ran a brilliant race, setting a new PB of 11:02, but it wasn’t enough to stop Elliott. The ever-present Joe Kenny was on the podium again with an 11:24 finishing time. Brian McCauliff (11:26) and Andy Hampsas (11:49) completed the top five.

‘It’s a tough race, and it requires more oxygen,’ Elliott said. ‘It’s a madhouse at the start,’ he added, having got caught in the middle of the pack as runners entered the stairwell.

‘I’m pretty confident about breaking (the record again),’ Elliott said. ‘The slow start might have cost me a few seconds. I think I can chop another 10 or 20 seconds off.’

Elliott and Malaxos said they’d be back in 1991 to defend their titles.

1990 aussies

Rishworth (2nd) and Malaxos (1st) celebrating at the finish line with the Australian flag

 

Full 1990 ESBRU resultssome results may differ from report due to differences in rounding up/down

Read the next installment in the series ‘A history of the Empire State Building Run-Up: 1991-1993