Posts Tagged ‘Jonathan Wyatt’

In 2002, Paul Crake was going for his fourth win in a row. But in the months leading up to the race he had lost to his closest ESBRU rival for the first time ever at a major race. The Australian champion was beatable, but could he lose in New York?

If you missed the first installment of this series on the history of the Empire State Building Run-Up covering 1978-1980, you can read it here. Or jump back to 1981-19831984-19871988-19901991-19931994-199719981999, 2000, or 2001 instead.

Otherwise read on for the next installment in the series and find out what happened at the Empire State Building Run-Up in 2002.

The phase of mastery

Mount Ainslie is a long way from Manhattan, and three ESBRU titles and a new course record don’t count for much in the mountains of Australia.

Six weeks after setting a stunning new record time at the Empire State Building Run-Up, Paul Crake was back home ready to defend his ACT Mountain Running Championship title.

The 12km race was to be run over a course that covered Mount Ainslie and the neighbouring Mount Majura.

As the reigning champion Crake had everything to lose and the new crop of mountain runners from Canberra and beyond weren’t going to make it easy on him.

Unfortunately for them, Crake was now deep in a phase of mastery that would last for a couple more years and would include some of the best performances of his mountain running career.

He took the win in a time of 50:31, ahead of Ben Rattray (52:23) and Adrian Sheppard (52:51).

2001 Sky Tower Vertical Challenge

Three weeks later, the ongoing battle between Paul Crake and Jonathan Wyatt at the Sky Tower in Auckland continued.

Crake had won the inaugural event in 1998, but for the past two years he had finished second behind Wyatt, the 1998 and 2000 world mountain running champion.

2001 sky tower race

Wyatt and Crake approach the finish of the 2001 Sky Tower Vertical Challenge

2001 played out just as the previous two years had. Wyatt took his third win in a row in a time of 5:27, with Crake settling for second once again with his finish of 5:43.

2001 auckland finishes

Melissa Moon won the women’s division in a record time of 6:57. Among those at the race was the Prime Minister of New Zealand Helen Clark, who made it to the top in 21:48.

Australian Mountain Running Championships 2001

With the ACT championship in the bag, Crake headed to the national championship race on Saturday 19th May 2001.

But his training had been seriously hampered by a stress fracture, which had stopped him from running shortly after the Auckland race.

Although Crake had maintained his fitness with a heavy cycling and swimming workload, he had only started running again a week before the Championships, after six weeks out of action.

No one really knew what sort of shape he was in or how the event might go.

The 11.5km race was held at Camp Mountain, the same venue where Crake had lost his national title in 1999. But despite the less than ideal build up to the race, this time was to be different. Just.

He managed to hold on for the win by crossing the line in 43:10, a mere four seconds ahead of Ross Hudson.

Crake followed up his second national title win with victories in June and July at the monthly run up Mount Ainslie.

Telekom Malaysia Towerthon 2001

On Sunday 5th August, it was back to the stairs as he headed to Malaysia to race up the Kuala Lumpur Tower. He was once again racing Jonathan Wyatt, who was going for his third win in a row at the 2,058-step tower.

But there were plenty of other strong runners in Kuala Lumpur that day, including elite mountain runners and an in-form Rudi Reitberger, who had finished third the year before.

As expected, Wyatt took the win, reaching the top in 10:32.

‘I was a little bit disappointed with my time’, Wyatt said. ‘But on the whole I’m happy winning it three times in a row.’

But, in a bit of a shock result, it was not Crake who came in behind the champion. Rudi Reitberger ran the Australian hard the whole way and reached the top in 11:03, four seconds ahead of Crake in third place. This was the first time Crake had finished behind any of his ESBRU rivals.

In the women’s category, Melissa Moon also successfully defended her title, winning the race in 13:14, breaking her own course record of 13:24 set the year before.

Second place went to Angela Sheean of Australia with a time of 14:07, while Russian Tatiana Cheigas, who clocked 14:25, was third.

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2001 Malaysia Telekom Towerthon winners Melissa Moon and Jonathan Wyatt

The Wyatt Conundrum

Paul Crake is well known in tower running. His long-standing records at the ESBRU and Taipei 101 mean his name pops up in articles every year. In debates about the greatest tower runner ever, Crake is always mentioned.

But far fewer are familiar with Jonathan Wyatt. Yet during the height of Paul Crake’s stair running exploits, he never managed to get a win over Wyatt. In the early 2000s Wyatt was a formidable and pretty much invincible tower runner, so why did he never compete at the most famous race of all?

‘I was never invited to the Empire State Building Run-Up, but also I never asked, either’, Wyatt told Tower Running UK.

‘The time of the year never suited me with where I was in racing, often on the track in New Zealand or in heavy build-up training ready for a Euro [mountain running] season.’

Given the race record between the two, one might assume that had Wyatt made it to New York he may well have beaten Crake’s record and gone sub 9:30. But he disagrees.

‘I don’t think i would have run faster than Paul’s Empire States time. Maybe theoretically with proper stair training, more power and anaerobic work, you could say it would be theoretically possible. But with the training I was doing at the time he did it I can say with some certainty I wouldn’t have broken it.’

‘I never trained [specifically] for the races – Kuala Lumpur I did only because it was convenient as a stopover either going to Europe or coming back to New Zealand, so it was actually a nice way to run a race and break up the trip. The mountain training I was doing would put me in say 90% shape for a tower race, but to be really good I would have needed to train more specifically.’

‘I think some of Paul’s best tower races were when he had switched over to cycling and so I think there is something in that with the type of anaerobic training that you do on the bike being a help for towers.’

According to Wyatt, the difference between the pair on the stairs was possibly not as pronounced as some of the finishing times between them may suggest.

‘Paul would train specifically for some of the tower events and when we raced together he would be very close to me, much more than in a mountain race, and if the races we did had a decent amount of running to get to the tower, such as Kuala Lumpur [starts with an 800m uphill run to the tower], I had an advantage. Auckland was a short run in [150m], but there it was so difficult to pass [on the stairs] that getting to the tower door first was almost the race in itself!’

World Mountain Running Championships 2001

With a win at the Australian Championships Crake earned a spot on the national team to compete at the World Mountain Running Championships held on 16th September in Arta Terme, Italy.

Alongside Crake in the Australian men’s team was Daniel Green, who had beaten him for the 2000 Australian Championship title. From the world of stair running there was Austria’s Rudi Reitberger and Russia’s Iourri Oussatchev.

Crake had his best run at the Worlds to date, finishing in 17th position in a field of around 150.

Italy’s Marco De Gasperi won his third title in five years (he would go on to win two more in 2003 and 2007), while fellow Italian Emanuele Manzi took second. In the following years both men would go on to successfully compete at numerous stair climbing events around the world.

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Paul Crake (2nd from right) finished 8th in the World Mountain Running Association Grand Prix series in 2001

The end of the 2001 season

Crake’s brilliant season continued right up until the end of 2001. He defended his Sydney Tower Run-Up (1,504 steps) title with a winning time of 7:01. In November he defended his Four Peaks title, while setting a new record at Mount Feathertop in the process.

In December he won his fifth Black Mountain Challenge and then in January 2002 he secured his third Crackenback Challenge win in a row.

An incredibly successful 12 months had Crake in confident mood heading to New York for the 25th ESBRU on Tuesday 5th February.

2002 Empire State Building Run-Up

2002 esbru poster

The horror and sadness of September 11th 2001 hung over the ESBRU in February 2002. With the collapse of the Twin Towers, the Empire State Building had once more become New York’s tallest building.

The start line was peppered with firefighters and police officers, determined to give everything in memory of their fallen comrades.

Speaking before the race, Jules Pontpovero (wearing #70 in the start line image below) from the New York Fire Department said, ‘It’s gonna be a breeze for us. They had bunker gear, they had smoke, fire. We just have shorts, t-shirts and you guys giving us support, so it’s gonna be easy’.

After the event, Captain Tim Morgan from the NYFD said, ‘I was just trying to think of the guys you knew personally, from the youngest guy to the most experienced – the chief of the department we lost [on September 11th]’.

‘I thought, ‘Don’t give up. These guys didn’t quit. They were still running in the building trying to recover civilians’. He finished in 14:30.

Firefighter Kenny Bohan said the race gave people something positive to focus on. ‘In some small way, I think we did that. People showed up. Nobody was afraid of anything, and people came from all over the world to run in this race.’ His 14:15 finishing time meant he was the fastest firefighter, or policeman, on the day.

Fantastic four?

Paul Crake was going for his fourth win in a row. Only Al Waquie (1983-87) had so far managed to win more than three titles. Given his performances over the past three years, Crake should have been a certainty for a fourth title. But this time things had changed slightly.

2003 paul crake lobby

Paul Crake in the Empire State Building lobby before the start of the race

With Rudi Reitberger having finished ahead of Crake in Kuala Lumpur a few months before, the 2002 Empire State Building Run-Up took on a different feel. A thread in Crake’s shroud of invincibility had come loose. At least one man at the race knew he was capable of beating Crake. Was this time going to be different?

The start line was packed with talent. In the colour image below there’s 1990 ESBRU champion Scott Elliott (9), Paul Crake (25), Markus Zahlbruckner (6), Rudi Reitberger (8), Sproule Love (red bandana) and Jaroslaw Lazarowicz (5, with water bottle). In the black and white photo the shot opens up and in comes Bernd Hammer (45) who was 3rd in 1997 and 2nd in 1998.

2002 mens start

2002 mens start two

Sproule Love was first through the door. Love had transitioned to stair running from elite level international winter biathlon and had finished seventh in his ESBRU debut in 1999. An injury while cycling had ruled him out of the event in 2000, but he blew back onto the scene in 2001 with a third place finish, despite entering the stairwell in 11th or 12th position.

In 2002 he was determined to get a better start.

‘In my third running of the race [2002], I hadn’t yet learned the difficult lesson about pacing on the stairs and was convinced that one had to be first to the stairwell to contend for the win (now I’m not so sure that is the case). I was a 4:22 miler in high school and had a decent kick, so I figured that with some speed work I could beat everyone to the door. Although I managed to do that, it came at a cost’, Love recalled in 2019.

‘After leading for about 25 stories, I realized I had gone too fast and throttled back. But the die was cast: Paul caught me, of course. I stayed with him for a while, but couldn’t manage to hang on. Later, near the 65th floor traverse, Rudi caught me as well and moved into second place. Fortunately, I didn’t completely blow up and held on for another spot on the podium in exactly the same time as the year before.’

As he had done in all his previous wins, Crake pulled away in the final third of the race with a show of strength that couldn’t be matched by his rivals.

He once again ran sub 10-minutes, this time finishing in 9:40. Rudi Reitberger was second, but still some way back in 10:36, with Sproule Love managing to hold on for another podium place with a finishing time of 11:09. Just behind him in 11:13 was Markus Zahlbruckner from Austria.

2002 crake wins

‘It’s really something to come back and win this race again’, said Crake. ‘I think really it couldn’t have gone better’.

The battle for fifth place was a tight one, as you can see in the video below (@ 2:05). With 20 floors to go, Filipino athlete Arland Macasieb was under serious pressure from Poland’s Jaroslaw Lazarowicz and the 1990 ESBRU champion Scott Elliott.

Macasieb managed to hold on to the fifth spot, reaching the top in 11:54. Scott Elliott followed in 12:00 and Lazarowicz in 12:13.

Moll goes for a record fourth title

In the women’s division all eyes were on Cindy Moll who was also going for a record fourth title, which would have made her the most successful female competitor at the ESBRU. Interestingly, another three-time winner was on the start line that day. Nina Kuscsik (1979-81), now 63 years old, was back at the race again after a 20-year hiatus. She would go on to finish in 28:07.

The feeling in the lobby was that Moll would saunter to a record win. The start line was devoid of her rivals of recent years. The race was practically ceremonial.

Unfortunately for Moll, nobody had told the young German mountain runner Kerstin Harbich.

Like Markus Zahlbruckner in the men’s event, Harbich had earned her spot at the ESBRU by winning the 776-step Danube Tower race in Vienna in November 2001.

Harbich came in well under the radar, but she had been training with ESBRU legend and three-time winner Kurt König (1995-97). For seven months she had trained specifically with the ESBRU in mind. First to win in Vienna and then in New York.

‘My new trainer, Kurt König, has chased me countless times over the 250 steps of the Mittenwald Calvary in addition to my regular mountain running training’, said Harbich.

The starter’s horn failed to go off, which led to confusion at the start line. The focused Moll took instant advantage of the pondering around her and was into the stairwell comfortably ahead of the others. Harbich quickly realised what was happening and she weaved past a couple of women to get in behind Moll. Now the race was on.

The German kept close behind Moll all the way through the first 64 floors and then made her move. In the race video below you can see Harbich’s decisive pass (@ 1:52-1:58).

‘I felt so good and I knew that I would be faster on the last 22 floors’, said Harbich.

She pulled away to win in 12:46, while Moll finished in 13:25.

2002 harbich wins

Kerstin Harbich crosses the line to win the 25th Empire State Building Run-Up, 2002

2002 winners photo

2002 ESBRU winners – Paul Crake and Kerstin Harbich

 

The elderly man at the start and finish of the video is Chico Scimone from Sicily, Italy, who at the age of 90 was taking part in his 12th ESBRU event.

2002 Empire State Building Run-Up results

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In 2001, everyone wanted to know just how much faster course record holder Paul Crake could run the Empire State Building. As it turned out, a lot faster.

If you missed the first installment of this series on the history of the Empire State Building Run-Up covering 1978-1980, you can read it here. Or jump back to 1981-19831984-19871988-19901991-19931994-199719981999 or 2000 instead.

Otherwise read on for the next installment in the series and find out how the ESBRU record fell again in 2001.

Back to the mountains

With the first ever sub 10-minute finish at the Empire State Building Run-Up in the bag, a jubilant Crake headed to Mt Coree on Saturday 18th March 2000 to attempt to win a second national mountain running title.

The Australian Mountain Running Championship featured the best of the best from around the country, so winning this was going to be a serious challenge.

The race involved a 7km uphill run to the summit of Mt Coree, followed by a 2.5km descent before turning around and running 2.5km back to the summit.

1999 champion Bruce Hogg didn’t return, but there was new, and old, competition standing between Crake and a second national title, including 1996 champion David Osmond.

In particular, former national junior cross country champion Daniel Green was coming into the race in fantastic form. He had clocked a half-marathon PB of 65 minutes in Tokyo back in January, and just 11 days before the national championship race he had broken the course record at the Mt Ainslie run-up by six seconds.

Crake and Green pulled away from the pack during the race and it came down to a straight battle between the two of them.

2000 aus champs david osmond 101

David Osmond (101) during the 2000 Championship race at Mt Coree.

Green pulled away towards the end to win the championship in 54:55, with Crake a couple of minutes back in 56:54.

2000 Sky Tower Vertical Challenge, Auckland

Two weeks later, on Saturday 1st April, Crake was in New Zealand to face off against Jonathan Wyatt who had beaten him at the Sky Tower Vertical Challenge in 1999.

As in the year before, the race for victory to the top of the 1,051 stairs was between these two giants.

pjimage

Wyatt and Crake head toward the finish at the 2000 Sky Tower Vertical Challenge

The times were slightly slower than the year before but the result was the same, with Wyatt winning in 5:20 and Crake second in 5:42.

pjimage (1)

Mt Ainslie Run Up

Just three days after the Auckland race, Crake was back to winning ways at the Mt Ainslie Run Up in Canberra, finishing in a personal best of 10:39.

Held on the first Tuesday of every month, the race attracted top runners from all around ACT and NSW. The course was 2.2km long with a 230 metre elevation gain.

He would go on to win the run-up five more times in the year 2000, and set a new course record of 10:11 on the 14th November.

Telekom Malaysia Towerthon 2000

On May 14th, Crake was in Malaysia to race up the Kuala Lumpur Tower. He was facing off against a highly accomplished group of international athletes from various disciplines, including Jonathan Wyatt, Rudi Reitberger and Russian mountain runner Iourri Oussatchev (who would finish 13th at the World Mountain Running Championships a few months later).

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Kuala Lumpur Tower, Malaysia

Wyatt was the defending champion of the grueling event, which began with an 800m uphill run into a climb of 2,058 steps.

Wyatt once more dominated on the stairs, breaking his own course record and winning in 10:24. Crake was second and Reitberger was third.

In the women’s division, Angela Sheean (1999 ESBRU champion and newly crowned two-time Australian Mountain Running Champion) was back to defend her KL Tower title. She was facing off against New Zealanders Melissa Moon, who had placed third at the World Mountain Running Championship in 1997 and 1998, and Maree Bunce who had won the Sky Tower race in Auckland in April and had finished third at the World Championships in 1999.

It was Moon who took the win in 13:24.

World Mountain Running Championships 2000

In September Crake took part in his third World Mountain Running Championship, which was held in Bergen, Germany. The 12km race was a hard one and Crake finished 54th in a field of 131 men, his poorest finish in the event.

The incredible Jonathan Wyatt won the race to secure his second world mountain running title.

Closing out the year on top

Despite some disappointments in the first two thirds of the year, the back end of 2000 was packed full of fantastic performances by Paul Crake.

In August he won the Mt Tennent Challenge and in November he won the Four Peaks event.

This four-day event involves a race each day up one of the peaks in the mountainous region north-west of Melbourne.

Crake set new course records at each of the mountains he ran: Porepunkah, Feathertop, Hotham and Buffalo.

He was also back to winning ways on the stairs, taking his second title at the Sydney Tower Run-Up with a record-breaking time of 6:52.

He finished the year with his fourth straight victory at the 5km Black Mountain Challenge, taking the win in a personal best 17:11.

The new year began with a win and new course record at the Crackenback Challenge in Thredbo in the Snowy Mountains of NSW. In supreme form, he headed to New York for the ESBRU on Wednesday 7th February 2001.

2001 Empire State Building Run-Up

Given his sub 10-minute performance the year before, and how far he’d finished ahead of experienced ESBRU athletes Terry Purcell and Rudi Reitberger, the question at the 2001 Empire State Building Run-Up wasn’t, ‘Can anyone catch Crake?’, it was, ‘How fast can he go?’.

Although the fast finishers from the previous few years were missing, there were a few familiar names at the start line who’d be aiming for a top-ten or top-15 spot, including Stephen Marsalese who had first raced ESBRU in 1996, and Rolf Majcen who had debuted in 2000.

Holger Munkelt from Germany was also back for another go at the course.

holger munkelt

Holger Munkelt

Coming from a middle and long-distance road running background – with a 2.25 marathon among his many accomplishments – Munkelt had taken part in his first stair race in 1997 at the City-Hochhaus, which at the time was part of the University of Leipzig campus. He had won that 691-step race with ease. The top prize for the winner was a trip to New York to race the ESBRU the following year.

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City-Hochhaus, Leipzig

Following his debut at the 1998 ESBRU, where he finished fifth, he went on to win races at the Berlin TV Tower and the Monument of the Battle of the Nations in Leipzig.

Munkelt was certainly one to watch, although he would probably have to do a fair bit better than his 11:47 from 1998 to be in contention for a podium place.

There were more incredibly strong racers among the 113 other men competing.

Thailand’s 5000m and 10,000m record holder, Boonchu Jandacha, had been invited over to take part.

Markus Zahlbruckner was maintaining the strong tradition of excellent Austrian athletes to compete at the ESBRU. His compatriots Bernd Hammer, Rudi Reitberger and Matthias Schreiner had all managed to make it on to the podium at least once, and Zahlbruckner was eager to join their ranks.

For Zahlbruckner, success in stair running began in 1999, when he finished second at the 776-step Danube Tower race in Vienna. In November 2000, he won the Danube Tower event, which earned him an invitation to the 2001 Empire State Building Run-Up.

Strong Brazilian Sandro Goncalves was sure to be in the mix for a top five finish. He would later go on to represent his country at international level duathlons. A strong Pole called Jaroslaw Lazarowicz also had a good shot at a top-five finish.

Sproule Love, a crossover athlete who had finished in the top-10 at the US Olympic Trials for winter biathlon in 1998, was flying the flag for the home nation and was favoured to be the top-finishing American male. He had finished 7th in his ESBRU debut in 1999 without any specific preparation, but was now back having done some more specific work to be ready for the demands of tower running.

2001 start line

(L-R) Paul Crake (1), Sproule Love (blue hat, head down behind Crake) Rolf Majcen (flowery leggings checking watch), Markus Zahlbruckner (15), Carlos Parra (11), Sandro Goncalves (10), Boonchu Jandacha (7) and Jaroslaw Lazarowicz (red and white)

All-in-all it was a strong field of athletes, but whether any of them could hang with Crake for the full duration of the course was to be seen.

As usual Crake got an excellent start and made it first through the door into the stairwell. He then ran a brilliant race, dropping his rivals in the final third of the course. Lazarowicz ran with him over the first 50 floors but was unable to maintain the pace and Crake dropped him. In the race video below (@ 1:16) you can see how strong and fresh Crake still looks at the 65th floor.

Crake would have known he was going fast and probably felt another sub 10-minute finish was on the cards. But the king of the ESBRU was accustomed to running naturally, eschewing technology and sensing his way up the building with a finely honed internal pacing system. Without a watch he couldn’t have known exactly how fast he had run.

His finishing time was an unbelievable 9:37. He had taken 16 seconds off his improbable winning time from the year before.

2001 colour crake finish

Paul Crake sets a new course record of 9:37

‘You know what they say, ‘third time lucky’, but I’ve already won the race twice so it’s more like, ya know…I’m pretty pleased about that one’, Crake said. ‘The race went pretty much as I planned. There was a lot of pushing and shoving at the start but then I settled in.’

The race for the remaining podium places was tightly contested. Germany’s Holger Munkelt took second in 11:02 and American Sproule Love became only the second American since 1994 to make it onto the podium (Jesus Zerpa was third in 1998).

Moll aims for third title

It was an exclusive group of women that had won the Run-Up three times: Nina Kuscsik (1979-81), Janine Aiello (1985-86, 1988) and Belinda Soszyn (1994, 1996-97). At the 2001 ESBRU Cindy Moll was heavily tipped to join them.

In January she had broken the course record at the Bop to the Top in Indianapolis, with a winning time of 4:26. It was the seventh time in a row she’d won the race. Among the 38 women on the start line in New York, she was the one to beat.

Moll’s ESBRU rival Fiona Bayly was back again, hoping to push the reigning champion a bit harder than she had in 2000.

2001 womens start

Also in the race was Nelly Simón from Mexico (who we suspect may be the same Simón that’s now a sports analyst with ESPN). Her 15:00 finish the year before had earned her fifth place, so she was an outside shot for a podium place given the slightly reduced quality of the field compared to previous editions.

Also an outside shot for third place was Stacy Creamer, who had finished ahead of Simón in 2000, clocking a 14:22. Not among the fastest women, but possibly good enough to get her on the podium if the going was slow all-round. Over the following 10-15 years, Creamer actually went on to become a solid age group duathlete and triathlete, competing at international competitions for the USA and even bagging some top-3 finishes.

Bayly, Moll and Simón all got good starts, with Moll getting off the line marginally quickest. But the taller Simón kept her arms out and managed to muscle ahead of Moll to get into the stairwell first. Moll followed, with Bayly immediately behind her.

But as it turned out, Moll could have given her rivals a minute head start, and she would still have reined them in, such was her conditioning on the day.

The two-time champ was unstoppable, clocking a personal best 12:45 and securing her third win from four starts.

‘I didn’t like the beginning, I never do’, Moll told reporters. ‘Fortunately I didn’t fall. It’s really hard at the beginning because it’s that mass start, but after I got through the first few floors and away from the pack, then I felt a lot better about the race.’

 

2001 Empire State Building Run-Up results

For 23 years, a sub 10-minute finish at the Empire State Building Run-Up stood as a seemingly impossible mark to achieve. Then reigning champion Paul Crake turned up.

If you missed the first installment of this series on the history of the Empire State Building Run-Up covering 1978-1980, you can read it here. Or jump back to 1981-19831984-19871988-19901991-19931994-19971998 or 1999 instead.

Otherwise read on for the next installment in the series and find out how the record fell at ESBRU in 2000.

First year as an ESBRU champion

After his record-breaking ESBRU run on 25th February 1999, Paul Crake returned to Australia for what would turn out to be a year of mixed fortunes.

There is no obvious record online of the 1999 ACT Mountain Running Championship (which usually took place around Feb/March), so whether Crake defended his title this year or not is a mystery for now. But after such an outstanding year in 1998, he had plenty of other titles to defend in 1999.

On Tuesday 6th April he got started with another hard-fought win at the Mt Ainslie run up in Canberra.

Back to Auckland

On the 10th April, Crake headed back to Auckland to defend his title at the Sky Tower Vertical Challenge.

In its second year, the event attracted around 600 competitors and among them were a host of incredible athletes.

Alongside Crake (the Empire State Building Run-Up and Sydney Tower Run-Up champion), was Jonathan Wyatt, the 1998 World Mountain Running Champion. Guainas Salanga, winner of the inaugural Kuala Lumpur Towerthon in 1998 was also there. The tough Kuala Lumpur race he’d won involved a 800m uphill run into the tower to scale 2,058 steps.

Reports say a fourth-place finisher at the World Mountain Running Championship was also at the event, which is likely to have been New Zealander Aaron Strong.

The race began with a 150m run along Federal Street before runners turned into the tower and up the 1,051 stairs. The pace over the first 150m was apparently very fast and there was a bit of a melee up the first five floors, with elbows thrown and plenty of shouts to move over for faster runners.

Once the runners settled a bit, it became a two-man race between Crake and Wyatt.

Wyatt was an incredible athlete who excelled at a multitude of distances. In 1996 he had competed in the 5,000m at the Atlanta Olympic Games for New Zealand. His personal best at the distance was 13:27.

Jonathan Wyatt cross country

Jonathan Wyatt

In 1997 he turned his focus to mountain running and the following year won his first World Championship title.

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Paul Crake approaches the finish of the 1999 Sky Tower Vertical Challenge

1999 wyatt stairs

Jonathan Wyatt closes in on victory

It was Wyatt who came out on top in the second edition of the Sky Tower Vertical Challenge. He won in a time of 5:17, while Crake finished second in 5:38.

1999 wyatt finish

Wyatt wins in 5:17

1999 sky tower crake finish

Crake takes second in 5:38

Australian Mountain Running Championships 1999

The next major race in Crake’s calendar was the defence of his national mountain running title on Saturday 26th June.

The 13.2km race was held at Camp Mountain, about 12 miles outside of Brisbane.

The result didn’t go the way Crake would have hoped, and he succumbed to his second title loss of 1999. Bruce Hogg took the win in 52:59, with Crake finishing second in 53:45.

In the women’s division, the new ESBRU champion Angela Sheean took victory to earn a spot alongside Crake at the World Mountain Running Championships in Borneo.

In the World Championship race in September on Mt Kinabalu, Crake managed to finish in 37th position (out of 99 finishers).

Kuala Lumpur Towerthon 1999

In July, Crake was in Malaysia to race against Jonathan Wyatt at the Kuala Lumpur Towerthon. The tough race began with an 800m uphill run into a climb of 2,058 steps.

As he had done in Auckland, Wyatt got the better of his Australian rival, winning the race in 10:39. Crake was second in 11:22 and A. Geevaraj was third in 12:16.

In the women’s division, the new ESBRU and Australian Mountain Running champion Angela Sheean faced off against fellow Australian and three-time ESBRU champion Belinda Soszyn.

In a closer race than the men, Sheean took the win in a time of 14:18. Malaysia’s Yuan Yu Fang was second in 14:30 and Soszyn third in 14:56.

1999 kl champs wyatt sheean

Jonathan Wyatt and Angela Sheean

Into the new millennium

We were unable to find any record of the Sydney Tower Run-Up which was scheduled for September 1999, so are not sure if Crake defended his title that year. Despite a year of mixed fortunes, he saw out the end of the 20th century on a high by winning his third Black Mountain Challenge in a row on the 12th December 1999.

In the new millennium, he picked up where he’d left off, with winning ways. Just 10 days before he was due to race the Empire State Building, he won the ACT Mountain Running Championship, the same event that had launched his successful senior career in 1998. Despite an up-and-down past 12 months, recent wins had buoyed Crake’s confidence and leading into the race at the Empire he was a clear favourite to win.

The sub 10-minute finish

133 men took part in the 23rd edition of the Empire State Building Run-Up on Wednesday 23rd February 2000.

Jesus Zerpa, third in 1998, was back, as was Austria’s Rudi Reitberger who had made it onto the podium in 1999. Fellow Austrian, Rolf Majcen, had also made the trip over to New York for the biggest race on the tower running calendar.

1998 champion Terry Purcell was hoping to go one better than his second-place finish in 1999.

But all eyes were on Paul Crake. Could he do what nobody else had ever achieved and break the 10-minute mark?

2000 mens start

Paul Crake (centre, #1) flanked by Terry Purcell (centre-right, #2) and Rudi Reitberger (centre-left #3)

He got off to a great start, making it first into the stairwell. And that was it. He was gone. Just as he’d done in 1999, he hit the stairs in first position and stayed there.

When Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile mark in 1954, he did so by just over half-a-second. When Pete Squires broke the sub 11-minute mark at ESBRU in 1981, he also managed it by around half a second.

There would be no split-seconds for Crake. His finishing time was an emphatic 9:53. He had destroyed his own course record by 22 seconds and achieved something that many thought impossible. The image below clearly shows him through the line at 9:52, but the official recorded time was rounded up.

To put this into context for those unfamiliar with tower running and the Empire State Building Run-Up. Crake is the only person to have ever run the course in under ten minutes. The closest other time is the 10:07 ran by German Thomas Dold in 2009 (Thorbjorn Ludvigsen managed a 10:06 in 2014, but the race course was slightly shorter that year so his time isn’t directly comparable). All of the great tower runners that have followed Crake have been some way off his amazing time. But he wasn’t done yet. In the following years he would truly shock everyone.

2000 crake finish

The first sub 10-minute finish at the Empire State Building Run-Up

In the battle for second place, Terry Purcell and Rudi Reitberger were closely matched. The Austrian had trailed Purcell by just five seconds in 1999.

In the race video below you can see the pair tight together as they reach the crossover point at the 65th floor, with Purcell leading the way (1:03).

But somewhere over those last 20 floors, Reitberger managed to slip past the Aussie and reverse their positions from the year before.

Reitberger crossed the line in 10:56, while Purcell completed the course in 11:08.

mens podium

Rudi Reitberger, Paul Crake and Terry Purcell

Crake said his debut in 1999 helped provide the base for his incredible win in 2000. ‘I think it comes down to experience. There’s been a couple of races in Australia where I’ve bummed up the start and I couldn’t come through. But when you’ve got the confidence that you can come through, it helps in a race like this.’

‘Today the pain sort of started coming after 20 or 30 floors, then it maintained at that level. Then about, sort of, the 55 mark, I thought I might have gone out a bit hard here. I might have to back off. But nah, I thought I’ll stick with it, and fortunately I was able to hold the pace until the finish line.’

Moll vs Bayly II

With no Australian woman in attendance and no other elite international competitors around, the 2000 ESBRU was a straight clash between homegrown, all-American talent.

In 1998, Cindy Moll had won on her debut, beating the experienced Fiona Bayly by a mere second. Moll hadn’t had a great race in 1999. Bayly, as far as we know, wasn’t there.

Now they would go head-to-head once again.

Cindy Moll was having a brilliant year already, despite it being just seven weeks old. On February 6th she won a race at the Amoco Building (now Aon Center) in Chicago. Then on the 12th February Moll took her second win of the year at the Bop to the Top in Indianapolis. She must have been brimming with confidence standing in the lobby of the Empire State Building.

Moll made an improvement to her start and this time she was first through the door, ahead of Bayly who was close behind.

2000 moll start

Cindy Moll (F3) reaches the stairwell door ahead of Fiona Bayly (F2) at the 2000 Empire State Building Run-Up

In the video below you see Moll climbing solo at around the 65th floor (0:49). There was to be no repeat of the super-close battle that played out in 1998 between herself and Bayly. The in-form Moll was a clear winner this time around. Her winning time was a personal best 12:51, meaning she joined a small group of elite women that had managed to run under 13 minutes.

2000 moll finish colour

2000 cindy moll finish

Cindy Moll wins her second Empire State Building Run-Up title in 2000

Bayly came in second in 13:13, while Theresa Uhrig – a sub three-hour marathoner from California – was third in 13:30.

Four days later Moll made it four wins from four starts as she successfully defended her title at the ‘Hustle up the Hancock’ race at the John Hancock Center in Chicago.

2000 winners photo

2000 Empire State Building Run-Up champions Paul Crake and Cindy Moll

 

2000 Empire State Building Run-Up results